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3 Critical Bullet Points That Convert Your Informal Interview Requests To Meetings

Business Meeting in Canada

I’ve always said that the quickest way to end your job search is to get into conversations with people who have the power and authority to hire you – this is the ultimate goal of networking.

Leaving your contact with a “Let me know if you hear anything” message is not networking. I can guarantee you, even if a position does come up, they will not think of you.

So you’re probably reaching out to people on LinkedIn and requesting for that Zoom/Coffee meeting already.

But in response, all you get is the silent cold shoulder.

A client once recently told me she started a LinkedIn conversation with someone. She thought it was going pretty well, up until the point she asked to meet in person, and the contact just ghosted her.

She said “But I’m not even asking for jobs. I told him so. He still didn’t want to meet.”

Remember this…

Even though you’ve declared you’re not asking for jobs (because you understand that makes people uncomfortable), people’s time are just as important to them.

Imagine if you received a meeting request at work from someone you barely know with the headline “Meeting to discuss upcoming project” and nothing else. Wouldn’t you be confused and even a little annoyed?

What project is this? How can I contribute? What do they need from me? Personally, I’d ignore this request.

It’s the same problem when you request to meet with someone without any context.

People do want to help – we all naturally do. But it’s up to you, the requester, to clarify exactly how your contact can help and what’s needed of them.

The next time you request someone to meet, make sure you include these three points in the request.

  1. Why you want to meet
  2. How long the meeting is going to take
  3. The agenda (3-5 questions you will ask them)

This is no different from setting up a meeting at the office. Except you are now meeting with someone on their own personal time. All the more reason to get it right.

If you are not clear in your messaging, you risk your contact assuming the worse – “This person is going to talk for hours; this is going to be a waste of my time; I probably can’t help this person”.

So if you want your contact to agree to meet you, do your part and clarify the purpose, time and agenda of the meeting.

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